Eggteresting Facts

What came first, the chicken or the egg? British researchers say the chicken – because the formation of eggs is only made possible by a protein found in hens’ ovaries.

Egg Facts

There are dozens of amazing facts about eggs.
Let me eggsplain them to you!

  • You can spin an egg to find out if it is fresh or hard-boiled. If it wobbles, it’s raw and if it spins easily, it’s hard-boiled.
  • A fresh egg sinks in water while stale eggs float. That’s because pockets in the shell become larger as it ages and its yolk shrinks.
  • All eggs float in salt water.
  • If you put an egg in vinegar, the acetic acid dissolves the eggshell’s calcium carbonate crystals and the egg will become clear. If you hard-boil the egg first, you’ll get a bouncy egg.
  • Eggs are graded using a process called “candling” in which they are passed over a bright light to check for internal defects.
  • While the shell of an egg shouldn’t be frozen, when cracked and beaten, eggs can keep in the freezer for up to 10 months. It is important to add one teaspoon of salt or one teaspoon of sugar per six yolks.
  • The eggshell accounts for about 12% of an egg’s weight and its strength is influenced by the hen’s diet.
  • Scientists consider eggs to be single cells – making an egg the largest single cell on Earth.
  • The mathematical description of an egg’s shape is “oblate” or a “prolate spheroid”.
  • The Oxford Companion to Food recommends using less-fresh eggs for hard-boiling because the whites of fresh eggs stick to the shell, making them harder to peel.
  • On average, Australians eat 217 eggs per person each year and the number is growing.
  • Global egg consumption is eggspected to exceed 1.15 trillion by 2015. That many eggs would weigh around 57 billion kilograms and circle the Earth more than 1600 times.
  • China is the world’s leading producer of eggs with eggproximately 390 billion per year. That’s half the world’s supply.
  • A whole egg contains about three tablespoons of liquid, with the yolk accounting for one tablespoon.
  • The world’s smallest egg is laid by the bee hummingbird while the world’s largest eggs are laid by ostriches.
  • The shell of the ostrich egg is 0.06 inches thick and so strong it can bear the weight of an adult man.
  • The largest bird egg in the world, laid by the now extinct Madagascan elephant bird, was 180 times bigger than an average chicken’s egg!
  • The world’s largest scrambled egg was made in New Zealand and contained 20,000 eggs.
  • “Century eggs” – or raw eggs preserved in a mixture of wood ash, salt, lime, tea, rice straw and clay – are a delicacy in China. Their name comes from the tradition of preserving eggs this way for “a hundred years”.
  • Hollow eggshells make great Easter decorations and miniature seed planter pots. You can also use them for compost or to control slugs.
  • French brides crack an egg on the threshold of their new homes for good luck in marriage and producing healthy babies.
  • The surface of an eggshell can contain as many as 17,000 tiny pores. So, an eggshell is actually porous and gases and water vapour can pass through the shell. This is a factor in egg freshness.
  • Eggs have their own day – the second Friday of every October is designated “World Egg Day”.
  • The title of “Omelette King” is officially held by Howard Helmer of the American Egg Board, who holds the Guinness world record for omelette making.
  • The Old English term for egg was “oeg,” but in the end the Nordic term “egg” won out.
  • It is fabled that during the Spring Equinox you can stand an egg on its end.
  • If you drop an egg on the floor it is easier to clean up by sprinkling salt on it.
  • The meringue originated in the Swiss town of Merhrinyghen in 1720 when a pastry chef named Gasparini created a small pastry made from dried egg foam and sugar.

Yolks and Whites

Here are the facts about egg yolks and whites.
It’s all here in yellow and white.

  • The more yellow and orange pigmented grains the chook eats, the yellower the yolk will be!
  • The yolk accounts for 33% of an egg’s liquid weight but contains approximately 59 calories.
  • The yolk contains all of its fat and less than half of its protein.
  • The yolk contains more vitamins and minerals than the white of the egg (not counting riboflavin and niacin).
  • The yolk is one of the only foods that are a natural source of Vitamin D.
  • The yolk contains visible discs called “blastoderms”. In infertile eggs, the blastoderm is solid white.
  • The yolk contains high concentration of keratin (which is good for our hair) so extracts are often used in shampoos.
  • All of an egg’s Vitamins A, D, E and zinc are in the yolk.
  • Double-yolkers’ typically come from younger hens whose egg production cycles are not yet properly synchronised.
  • It’s possible for a young hen to lay an egg with no yolk at all. These are called “no-yolkers”, “dwarf eggs” or “wind eggs”.
  • The record for the most yolks found in one egg is nine.
  • The “scientific” name for an egg white is the “albumen”.
  • The more transparent the “white”, the older the egg.
  • The white accounts for 67% of an egg’s liquid weight.
  • The white contains more than half of an egg’s protein and Vitamin B content.
  • The white can increase six to eight times when it’s beaten.
  • The white is more transparent than truly “white” – this cloudy appearance comes from the carbon dioxide which escapes through pores in the shell as an egg ages.
  • Egg whites have long been used as facials because of their drying properties. Cholesterol, lecithin and the fatty acids found in eggs are often used in skin care revitalisation and makeup products.
  • Did you know that punks use egg whites to harden their mohawks? Eggstreme!

Chicken Facts

Here chook, chook, chook!
Find out some amazing facts about chooks.

  • Egg-laying chooks descended from the Asian red jungle fowl (gallus gallus spadiceus) and are thought to have been domesticated for at least 8-10 thousand years.
  • Domestication was thought to have started in Vietnam more than 10,000 years ago. Other sources claim Europeans had hens as early as 600 BC and that they were brought by Columbus on his New World voyage to China in 1400 AC.
  • Whatever story you subscribe to, chickens are believed to be the first domestic animal.
  • The chicken is in fact the closest living relative to the T-Rex.
  • China has the most chickens with around four billion.
  • There are more chickens on Earth than humans – in fact, estimates show this number is more than double.
  • It’s illegal to eat a chicken with a fork in Gainesville USA, the “Chicken Capital of the World”.
  • There are 150 species of chicken and at least 200 different varieties and breeds.
  • Different breeds of chickens produce different coloured eggs – blue, blue-green, red and speckled eggs are not uncommon.
  • A young hen is called a pullet for its first year, or until it begins laying.
  • Hens start laying at 18-20 weeks. The colour of the first egg she lays will be the colour she lays for life.
  • How often a hen lays depends on its breed – some lay daily, others only once or twice a week.
  • Hens are typically most productive in their first two years of life.
  • Older hens will lay larger, but fewer, eggs.
  • Hens will not typically lay eggs in the dark.
  • A hen can lay between 250 and 325 eggs per year.
  • A hen requires only 24 to 26 hours, 140 grams of feed and 300 millilitres of water to produce an egg.
  • A hen will turn the egg up to 50 times a day to prevent the yolk sticking to the side of the shell.
  • Half an hour after laying, she will start the egg production process all over again.
  • Chicks begin communicating with their mothers while they’re still inside the egg.
  • Hens often sing an “egg song” before, during or after laying an egg.
  • A chicken’s heart beats 4 to 5 times faster than a human’s, at approximately 300 beats per minute.
  • A rooster is male, a hen is female; both are chickens.
  • Chickens can change sex – this is estimated to occur in 1 out of every 10,000 chickens.
  • Roosters have been known to begin laying and trying to hatch eggs when, for example, a chicken coop is raided by foxes and all of the hens are killed.
  • If a rooster is not present in a flock of hens, one will often take on this role, stop laying eggs, and begin to crow.
  • Roosters are only necessary to fertilize eggs – hens lay eggs whether or not a rooster is present.
  • A rooster is one of the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac. The next Year of the Rooster is 2017. If you were born in 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, or 2005 you’re thought to have a flamboyant or “cocky” personality!
  • Alektorophobia is a fear of chickens.
  • Chickens are social animals that show sophisticated group behaviours and establish social hierarchies – hence the term “pecking order”.
  • Chickens can recognize each other’s faces and will avoid chickens they don’t know.
  • Chickens have more than 30 distinct cries that are used to communicate a wealth of information – including the presence of food or a predator. They even have separate alarm calls depending on whether a predator is travelling by land or sea!
  • Chickens learn by example and so may be encouraged to lay by the presence of a fake (or real) egg in a nest box.
  • A broody hen of any breed can be used to hatch eggs and raise chicks from other hens of any breed.

Egg Facts

There are dozens of amazing facts about eggs.
Let me eggsplain them to you!

  • You can spin an egg to find out if it is fresh or hard-boiled. If it wobbles, it’s raw and if it spins easily, it’s hard-boiled.
  • A fresh egg sinks in water while stale eggs float. That’s because pockets in the shell become larger as it ages and its yolk shrinks.
  • All eggs float in salt water.
  • If you put an egg in vinegar, the acetic acid dissolves the eggshell’s calcium carbonate crystals and the egg will become clear. If you hard-boil the egg first, you’ll get a bouncy egg.
  • Eggs are graded using a process called “candling” in which they are passed over a bright light to check for internal defects.
  • While the shell of an egg shouldn’t be frozen, when cracked and beaten, eggs can keep in the freezer for up to 10 months. It is important to add one teaspoon of salt or one teaspoon of sugar per six yolks.
  • The eggshell accounts for about 12% of an egg’s weight and its strength is influenced by the hen’s diet.
  • Scientists consider eggs to be single cells – making an egg the largest single cell on Earth.
  • The mathematical description of an egg’s shape is “oblate” or a “prolate spheroid”.
  • The Oxford Companion to Food recommends using less-fresh eggs for hard-boiling because the whites of fresh eggs stick to the shell, making them harder to peel.
  • On average, Australians eat 217 eggs per person each year and the number is growing.
  • Global egg consumption is eggspected to exceed 1.15 trillion by 2015. That many eggs would weigh around 57 billion kilograms and circle the Earth more than 1600 times.
  • China is the world’s leading producer of eggs with eggproximately 390 billion per year. That’s half the world’s supply.
  • A whole egg contains about three tablespoons of liquid, with the yolk accounting for one tablespoon.
  • The world’s smallest egg is laid by the bee hummingbird while the world’s largest eggs are laid by ostriches.
  • The shell of the ostrich egg is 0.06 inches thick and so strong it can bear the weight of an adult man.
  • The largest bird egg in the world, laid by the now extinct Madagascan elephant bird, was 180 times bigger than an average chicken’s egg!
  • The world’s largest scrambled egg was made in New Zealand and contained 20,000 eggs.
  • “Century eggs” – or raw eggs preserved in a mixture of wood ash, salt, lime, tea, rice straw and clay – are a delicacy in China. Their name comes from the tradition of preserving eggs this way for “a hundred years”.
  • Hollow eggshells make great Easter decorations and miniature seed planter pots. You can also use them for compost or to control slugs.
  • French brides crack an egg on the threshold of their new homes for good luck in marriage and producing healthy babies.
  • The surface of an eggshell can contain as many as 17,000 tiny pores. So, an eggshell is actually porous and gases and water vapour can pass through the shell. This is a factor in egg freshness.
  • Eggs have their own day – the second Friday of every October is designated “World Egg Day”.
  • The title of “Omelette King” is officially held by Howard Helmer of the American Egg Board, who holds the Guinness world record for omelette making.
  • The Old English term for egg was “oeg,” but in the end the Nordic term “egg” won out.
  • It is fabled that during the Spring Equinox you can stand an egg on its end.
  • If you drop an egg on the floor it is easier to clean up by sprinkling salt on it.
  • The meringue originated in the Swiss town of Merhrinyghen in 1720 when a pastry chef named Gasparini created a small pastry made from dried egg foam and sugar.

Yolks and Whites

Here are the facts about egg yolks and whites.
It’s all here in yellow and white.

  • The more yellow and orange pigmented grains the chook eats, the yellower the yolk will be!
  • The yolk accounts for 33% of an egg’s liquid weight but contains approximately 59 calories.
  • The yolk contains all of its fat and less than half of its protein.
  • The yolk contains more vitamins and minerals than the white of the egg (not counting riboflavin and niacin).
  • The yolk is one of the only foods that are a natural source of Vitamin D.
  • The yolk contains visible discs called “blastoderms”. In infertile eggs, the blastoderm is solid white.
  • The yolk contains high concentration of keratin (which is good for our hair) so extracts are often used in shampoos.
  • All of an egg’s Vitamins A, D, E and zinc are in the yolk.
  • Double-yolkers’ typically come from younger hens whose egg production cycles are not yet properly synchronised.
  • It’s possible for a young hen to lay an egg with no yolk at all. These are called “no-yolkers”, “dwarf eggs” or “wind eggs”.
  • The record for the most yolks found in one egg is nine.
  • The “scientific” name for an egg white is the “albumen”.
  • The more transparent the “white”, the older the egg.
  • The white accounts for 67% of an egg’s liquid weight.
  • The white contains more than half of an egg’s protein and Vitamin B content.
  • The white can increase six to eight times when it’s beaten.
  • The white is more transparent than truly “white” – this cloudy appearance comes from the carbon dioxide which escapes through pores in the shell as an egg ages.
  • Egg whites have long been used as facials because of their drying properties. Cholesterol, lecithin and the fatty acids found in eggs are often used in skin care revitalisation and makeup products.
  • Did you know that punks use egg whites to harden their mohawks? Eggstreme!

Chicken Facts

Here chook, chook, chook!
Find out some amazing facts about chooks.

  • Egg-laying chooks descended from the Asian red jungle fowl (gallus gallus spadiceus) and are thought to have been domesticated for at least 8-10 thousand years.
  • Domestication was thought to have started in Vietnam more than 10,000 years ago. Other sources claim Europeans had hens as early as 600 BC and that they were brought by Columbus on his New World voyage to China in 1400 BC.
  • Whatever story you subscribe to, chickens are believed to be the first domestic animal.
  • The chicken is in fact the closest living relative to the T-Rex.
  • China has the most chickens with around four billion.
  • There are more chickens on Earth than humans – in fact, estimates show this number is more than double.
  • It’s illegal to eat a chicken with a fork in Gainesville USA, the “Chicken Capital of the World”.
  • There are 150 species of chicken and at least 200 different varieties and breeds.
  • Different breeds of chickens produce different coloured eggs – blue, blue-green, red and speckled eggs are not uncommon.
  • A young hen is called a pullet for its first year, or until it begins laying.
  • Hens start laying at 18-20 weeks. The colour of the first egg she lays will be the colour she lays for life.
  • How often a hen lays depends on its breed – some lay daily, others only once or twice a week.
  • Hens are typically most productive in their first two years of life.
  • Older hens will lay larger, but fewer, eggs.
  • Hens will not typically lay eggs in the dark.
  • A hen can lay between 250 and 325 eggs per year.
  • A hen requires only 24 to 26 hours, 140 grams of feed and 300 millilitres of water to produce an egg.
  • A hen will turn the egg up to 50 times a day to prevent the yolk sticking to the side of the shell.
  • Half an hour after laying, she will start the egg production process all over again.
  • Chicks begin communicating with their mothers while they’re still inside the egg.
  • Hens often sing an “egg song” before, during or after laying an egg.
  • A chicken’s heart beats 4 to 5 times faster than a human’s, at approximately 300 beats per minute.
  • A rooster is male, a hen is female; both are chickens.
  • Chickens can change sex – this is estimated to occur in 1 out of every 10,000 chickens.
  • Roosters have been known to begin laying and trying to hatch eggs when, for example, a chicken coop is raided by foxes and all of the hens are killed.
  • If a rooster is not present in a flock of hens, one will often take on this role, stop laying eggs, and begin to crow.
  • Roosters are only necessary to fertilize eggs – hens lay eggs whether or not a rooster is present.
  • A rooster is one of the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac. The next Year of the Rooster is 2017. If you were born in 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, or 2005 you’re thought to have a flamboyant or “cocky” personality!
  • Alektorophobia is a fear of chickens.
  • Chickens are social animals that show sophisticated group behaviours and establish social hierarchies – hence the term “pecking order”.
  • Chickens can recognize each other’s faces and will avoid chickens they don’t know.
  • Chickens have more than 30 distinct cries that are used to communicate a wealth of information – including the presence of food or a predator. They even have separate alarm calls depending on whether a predator is travelling by land or sea!
  • Chickens learn by example and so may be encouraged to lay by the presence of a fake (or real) egg in a nest box.
  • A broody hen of any breed can be used to hatch eggs and raise chicks from other hens of any breed.

Infographics

Check out some of these amazing facts about eggs and chooks with our range of Sunny Queen Farms infographics.

Remember to click on the infographic to view the full version along with sharing it with your friends – who knew eggs could be so interesting!

Entomophagy Or Eggs?


In many countries, Entomophagy, or eating insects is popular. They’re relatively cheap and a great way to get protein in your diet.

We had a look at some of the most popular insect dishes from around the world and packed them into a handy infographic, along with other great protein facts.

Infographic - Entomophagy Or Eggs?

Infographic - Eggteresting Facts